Homeless Still Need Help in the Summer!

Joyce Robinson of NEOCH sorts items purchased with SocksPlus funds

It is hot and the dog days of summer.  No one is thinking about homeless people at this time.  Did you know that the population does not decline in the summer.  Yes, the number of men staying in the shelter decreases in the summer.  Many find it easier to sleep outside during the summer.  They use the drop in centers for showers and meals, but spend their time sleeping in tents, under bridges or in abandoned structures.  So, it is not as though they have ended their homelessness as much as they took a break from shelter. 

The number of families experiencing homelessness actually increases during the summer.  Grandma has been helping out the daughter and her kids so that they do not have to change schools during the school year, but cannot take a summer of the kids around the house endangering the Grandma's housing if the landlord finds out.  It is too much of a strain for many families and they relocate to the shelters. 

The homeless outreach teams are out building relationships with people who choose not to use the shelters.  Metanoia outreach staff are delivering hygiene items to guys hanging out at the shower program at St. Malachi.  We are going to the dinners over at St. Patricks to see if there are life sustaining needs that these guys might have.  Care Alliance outreach nurses are taking blood pressure and looking for sleep deprived individuals who live outside.  PATH workers are driving homeless people to medical appointments and making sure that they are taking their medicine.  Our Community West Foundation funded outreach trainees Fred and James are taking out sleeping bags and tents to people who do not want to give up their pet while they are without housing. 

Photo by Bob Tuneberg, from The Villager Newspaper and Crocker Press and Community West FoundationThe point is that homelessness is not just a winter problem.  We have had a large year-round problem with homelessness for 30 years here in Cleveland, and we do not see any relief in the summer.  We need your help.  We need water for those who try to make it off the streets on their own.  We need hygiene kits for those who use the showers at the Cosgrove Center.  It gets cold at night so we still distribute blankets year round.  Here is the list of items that we collect and distribute. We have posted photos on the front of the website to remind people that we need items even during the summer to distribute.  If you can't help with donated items, just send a donation and we will purchase the items to give out.  Just put "outreach" in the memo line so we know that they go to help those living outside.  You can also donate cash to the Community West Foundation to the SocksPlus program.  Those funds go to the outreach collaborative organized by NEOCH.  Thanks for your help.

by Brian Davis

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St. Paul's Hope for the Homeless

This picture came from Rev. Doug Horner at St. Paul's Community Church on Franklin Blvd.  There are a number of people like "Mark" who stays outside and no matter what we do will not go inside.  He is reluctant to accept any charity, but he is not a threat to himself.  This is a temporary solution that the West Side folks came up with to keep these shelter resistant folks alive.  According to Rev. Horner, "The thought behind it being this:  sometimes we can’t pass policies, or make a wave of change that helps the most vulnerable. But we can make a difference one person at a time. This small passive energy home is so well insulated that body heat will keep a person warm inside."

Here is a photo of the crew and the new “sleeping pod” - located Greater Old Brooklyn neighborhood; out in the woods on the edge of a dirt bike trail, on the edge of a vacant lot near a construction site. Thanks to the Corrado family for generously giving time, talent and money to make this a reality.  Thanks to Casey for his shop space.  Thanks to Lucy for her carpentry and patience as we laid it all out. Thanks to Tyrone the outreach worker for coordinating this effort...Just 4 days and tons of labor hours by volunteers and stipend workers with St. Paul’s. 

"Mark" has been living in a lean to for years, and there are a few others who live in the neighborhood.  Many of these guys have been hassled, beat up, frozen, etc.  They regularly hangs out at a nearby fast food place.  "Mark" is always the first one in in the morning, and all the staff know him.  A few people visit "Mark" regularly, like the volunteers from Ignatius, Labre and Care Alliance who travel around with food and blankets. 

"Mark" again was reluctant to accept charity, and didn’t want the house.  The volunteers pictured above set it up nearby anyway.  It is a temporary solution that will probably need to be moved in the Spring when construction season starts.  If you like the idea, you can donate the $500 to St. Paul's for the materials or you could volunteer to help construct the next one.  It is hoped that this is a way to build a trusting relationship with some of these guys to move them along to stability.  It is a hope to keep a person alive while we work through some of his issues, fears and suspicions. 

Thanks to all the volunteers at St. Paul's Community Church for building and moving this unit to help "Mark"

Brian Davis

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Cleveland Flats Clean Up 4/2/2016

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thank you to Downtown Cleveland Alliance for all their help with the truck to transport the trash from the Clean Up in the Flats today April 2, 2016.  Thanks to Dennis, NEOCH outreach trainee, for his last day organizing this huge clean up.  We wanted to get rid of some of the clutter from the winter.  Also thanks to the City of Cleveland Public Works folks under the leadership of Michael Cox for allowing us to dump the trash at the Ridge Road center. We made a good start of the Flats clean up, but plenty more work when the St. Ignatius students work on the project on Earth day. We also have to thank the five homeless individuals who helped today.

Brian Davis

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Outreach Leaders in Cleveland Stay Informed

Every month at the NEOCH Leaders meetings, NEOCH features one or two agencies and has a speaker from each agency present to the leaders what services the agency provides, how the agency operates and how the agency coordinates with other agencies so the leaders leave the meeting with a great understanding of how they can connect their clients with the featured agencies or other partners who attend the meeting.  At the March NEOCH monthly leader’s meeting, there were presentations from two agencies, one from United Way's First Call for Help/2-1-1 and one from Frontline Services Coordinated Intake.  

One of the many reasons people call 2-1-1 is that they may need an emergency shelter bed.  First Call for Help/2-1-1 is an information agency in Cuyahoga County for all the homeless services.  2-1-1 specialists listen to the caller’s needs and refer the caller to many community resources 24 hours a day, every day.  No matter what the problem may be, from needing medical care, to food or shelter, 2-1-1 is aware of each agency and how they can serve each client that calls. It could be a quick question or it could be a natural disaster like a fire, but 2-1-1 specialists are there to connect callers to information, services and advice from GED classes to prescription assistance. 

2-1-1 specialists refer people to Coordinated Intake and are familiar with the process for someone who suddenly becomes homeless. Frontline Services administers Coordinated Intake as a one-stop place to access the emergency shelters that are available in Cuyahoga County. The program is funded by Cuyahoga County and staff from EDEN Inc and Cleveland Mediation Center are stationed out of the Cosgrove Center on the Second Floor.  When someone is referred to Coordinated Intake, efforts are made to find them housing with a family/friend or to provide them with bus transportation out of town to a relative, etc.

When that is not a possibility then Coordinated Intake works with the person and determines the barriers to the person regaining housing and figures out a housing plan (short and long term) for them.  In the meantime, they are placed in Emergency shelter.  Single men go to 2100 Lakeside and families and single women either go to Norma Herr Woman’s Shelter or the Domestic Violence Center, Zelma George, Family Promise, West Side Catholic Center or Laura’s Home.  When these places are full there are overflow beds at Zelma George, West Side Catholic Center and Family Promise.

From there, those with low to moderate barriers to housing may be ready to leave on their own into housing or qualify for Rapid Rehousing (a program offering a security deposit and 4 months of rental assistance to families), and they are signed up for benefits.  Those with higher barriers to housing also qualify for Rapid Rehousing and may get even more help if their situation hasn’t changed in several months.  Some who end up with a disability or mental health diagnosis may receive a permanent Eden voucher for housing. 

All of the people who call 2-1-1 and go through Coordinated Intake/Central Intake receive an assessment, then it is determined what kind of help they need, even the unstated needs which the specialists who work with them are able to determine.  They then go into an emergency shelter with a housing plan and exit strategy in place. 

After hours and weekends, between 8 pm Friday and 8am Monday and week nights after 8pm, single men and women are to go directly to the main men's shelter or women's shelter.  Families are put in overflow beds until Monday morning when they can meet with the intake specialists to get their assessment and housing plans.  Coordinated Intake has 7 days to initiate rapid rehousing for these families and many of them are housed within 30 days. 

There are many other pieces of the puzzle and living in a temporary shelter may not meet the expectations of most people.   Men who are part of a family have to be screened to find out if they are a sex offender, families may be split up while they are in temporary shelter.  Shelters are not the most ideal places to stay.  They have their own set of problems: the food may not be what you are used to, some of the shelters may be overcrowded, and the conditions may not be ideal.  The shelters have rules and regulations that most people are not used to living by.  You are living amongst strangers who may have disabilities or varied backgrounds. The staff at the shelters may not be as compassionate as they should be or are burnt out.  Staff members may not even know what programs are available to you, which can be frustrating.

People homeless for the first time may be going through a trauma; they may be a victim of domestic violence.  Children may be pulled out of their schools and away from their friends, to live in the midst of strangers.  There are many things that may play a part in this being one of the worst times of a homeless person’s life.   Programs like 2-1-1 and Coordinated Intake give some of these people hope as they are assessed and given a housing plan.  They know where beds are available, which makes it easier on the family not able to find their own shelter.  Beds do not sit empty like they did in the past, and people with multiple barriers to housing are not stuck in the entry shelters.  Families may get encouragement from the fact that there is help available to them through Rapid Rehousing. 

I learned a lot about the behind the scenes work and mechanics of helping a person or family get a shelter bed when they have no place to stay.  I am so glad there are agencies like First Call for Help/2-1-1, Coordinated Intake and NEOCH who help individuals facing homelessness make their transition back to housing a little easier than it was before.  Cuyahoga County previously did not have an intake system and has come a long way from what it used to be with Coordinated Intake and 2-1-1.  This is a relatively new system for Cuyahoga County and it is progressively getting better.

NEOCH works hard to advocate for homeless individuals, working to make some of the conditions at the shelters better.  NEOCH fights for more shelter beds and to alleviate overcrowding.  NEOCH wants the shelters to be a safe place for men, women and families.  NEOCH wants to insure that clients at the shelters are adequately fed, and that they receive the materials they need to get out of the shelter system and into housing as quickly as possible.

by Denise Toth

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Tuesday Night Meal Is Back!!

We are so happy that the City is allowing the meal.  We had contacted the City of Cleveland for help and the Ministry were on the phone asking everyone they could think of for help. We heard that people connected with the Cleveland Police made this possible.   This is a great service and the women from the shelter appreciate the food so much.  Thank you to Rescuing the Perishing Ministry for the help in serving homeless people.

Brian Davis

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2015 Count Sees Increases Homeless People Downtown

Every year on Black Friday we count the number of homeless people sleeping downtown. By the way, can we change the day after Thanksgiving to Malcolm X Memorial Day instead of naming a day after commercial activities?  We can still call it Black Friday, but just for a different reason.  This year saw a pretty large increase from the three sleeping outside in 2012 to 2014 to eight in 2015. 

It is no where near the dark days of 1998 with 60 people sleeping around the welfare building and on Public Square, but it does reverse a trend from the last three years. It could be an anomaly because of the nicer weather, but I seem to remember 2012 being a warmer Black Friday.  It could be that the larger number of women and families requesting shelter translates to larger numbers outside even though we did not count any women downtown last week.  The longer that a shelter is operated the more people who have a negative experience at that facility and will not go back.  The longer we have 2100 Lakeside as the main shelter for men, the more likely that a low income individual will have some contact with the facility.  They may have stayed there and had their documents stolen or gotten in a physical altercation with another resident.  They may have been disrespected by a staff or a volunteer and may have decided to not return.  We have not seen a radical change in the shelter since 2002-3 when the shelter was taken by a different non-profit and could say, "Give us a try, we have all new management."  The large number of people sleeping on the West Side may view the relative open space downtown as attractive.  Shelter resistant people may be moving back downtown because the West Side is "overcrowded," and they value their solitude.  

In 2013, we detailed some of the reasons for the decrease in the number sleeping downtown as we also talked about those same issues in 2012Here is the 2014 summary of the count.  Much of the success we have seen still exist, but there are some dark clouds on the horizen.  We lost more shelter beds over the last year, and 2016 will see the loss of 82 beds with men's transitional decreasing.  We continue to see a lack of Rapid rehousing funds to meet the demand, long housing waiting lists and a sudden change in the hours for Coordinated Intake causing confusion and longer stays at shelter.  We continue to "divert" people seeking shelter to their cars or the streets.  

I got to talk to Yuri, Kenny, and George but the rest of the folks were asleep.  No one said that they were being harrassed by anyone, which is good.  We gave away many blankets, gloves and socks to the people we met.  We hope that this is just a one off increase, but community leaders should come together to make sure that the tools are in place to prevent this increase from becoming the norm.  This increase is in contrast the rosy picture presented by HUD in September as they announced the results of the faux "complete" counts in January of every year.   We do not want to return to the days when there were dozens of people downtown.  We usually consider this the low number for the winter because it is the holidays and families take their kin in during Thanksgiving.  It was also the time that Mayor White directed the police to start harassing homeless people as the Christmas shopping season started.  

Brian Davis

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Denver And Homelessness

The National Coalition for the Homeless met in Denver Colorado for their twice yearly face to face meeting and held a conference on criminalization of homelessness.  Denver is one of the 25 largest cities in America, and has made some progress on homelessness in America, but has a long way to go.  It is the state capital so there are far more resources available in Denver than other Colorado cities, but there are many people sleeping outside.  There is no guaranteed access to shelter like in New York and Cleveland. 

The police regularly ask homeless people to move along, but never answer the question, "to where?"   There are many who travel through Denver to greener pastures.  I met a man who was sleeping outside from Bangor Maine by way of Washington and Chicago who was deciding on whether to stay or move on.  The outreach teams had tried to work with him in his first three weeks in Denver which is more than happens in most cities.  There also seems to be a growing number of people migrating to Denver because of the recreational marijuana, which is a far more expensive of a habit than cigarettes.  Housing is extremely expensive with supply not matching demand.  They have far fewer abandoned properties when compared to most Midwestern cities, but they do exist. 

Denver has many more laws on the books restricting homeless people and a pretty strict panhandling law.  They do have a pretty amazing healthcare for the homeless operation with five clinics, including a brand new clinic attached to their permanent supportive housing project with dental services and a complete pharmacy.  I was impressed with the level of care delivered to homeless people with an attempt to make the healthcare for the homeless clinics a medical home for low income people.  They screen people who come in for mental health issues while they are assessing their physical health needs.  People do not have to make appointments somewhere else and then face other challenges such as timing and transportation.  The new Denver health care for the homeless clinic has a huge and respectful waiting area and a seamless process to apply for housing once they have sought healthcare assistance. 

In Cleveland, most of the services are built around the shelters and even with Coordinated intake those staying at shelter are easiest to find and usually get access before those waiting on the streets.  In Denver, the system seems to be centered around health care as the first point of contact for most.  Those without housing seem to look healthier than I have seen in the Midwest or the East Coast.  I don’t know if this is from the amount of walking necessary in western cities or the number of farm and domestic workers among the homeless population.  Transportation is much more accessible in Denver when compared to Cleveland but not like DC, NYC or Boston. 

Denver is a clean city, but about three times the number of people sleeping outside compared to Cleveland.  There are no where near the numbers of people living outside as Washington DC, San Francisco or Boston.  There were a number of grassroots organizations helping to provide a voice to those living in shelters or on the streets.  There was not a real advocacy Coalition focused on the needs of homeless people and providing input to government or the social service community.   This is not unusual for a capital city where advocacy groups get overshadowed by the State Coalitions and all the money and resources goes to state efforts.  There is not the tradition to organizing in union cities like Cleveland, Philadelphia and Chicago.  So, there is not a strong tenant association or commitment to organizing low income residents of the city. 

They are making progress and have built large numbers of affordable housing units reserved for homeless people.  They have permanent supportive housing for families which most cities have not found the ability to fund.  They are working on funding a law enforcement diversion program which is supposed to save the city money over incarceration.  Finally, there are horror movie scary Mimes performing in Downtown Denver, which is unsettling, but at least they are not dressed as clowns. 

Brian Davis

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Donations Still Needed

We made it through the horrible winter.  We had a report of one person suffering from frost bite and losing fingers, but no reports of people freezing to death.  We have to thank Community West Foundation for helping with all the donations and helping with putting people into motels during the extreme weather.  It was tough, but outreach teams, St. Pauls, Labre and Metanoia did a ton of work keeping people safe.  

It is spring and still a dangerous time.  Hypothermia is still a threat because people get wet and then it gets cold at night.  They may have prepared for the winter and the snow, and may let their guard down for the spring.  They may not have as many blankets or plastic or clothing as they had for the winter.  We are still collecting and distributing items. We have updated our flyer for the spring and that is available to print out and distribute. We give out items to the outreach teams every week. 

Flyer to print out and distribute

Teach In Last Week on the Importance of Outreach

We had a really nice open house at Winton on Lorain last week to see how wonderful these units are for the community.  We had presentations by EDEN and Frontline Services and many of the outreach workers in the community.  The highlight of the evening was with Roy and Mike talked about moving from the streets into housing.  They both talked about the importance of Jim Schlecht for helping to find their way into housing. 

County Council persons Dale Miller and Yvonne Conwell both attended to hear about this critical resource in the community.  Both Roy and Mike spent years on the streets, both turned to alcohol or drugs to cope and both were able to make it through a year of recovery. Winton on Lorain is right next to the VA transitional housing program, and that corner near the freeway has dramatically approved over the last 10 years. 

It was quite an education provided by Toni Johnson and Denise Toth who spoke about how valuable outreach is in the community.  They talked about building trusting relationships and not giving up on the people outside.  All the outreach teams talked about the difficult times many of these guys have in finding help.  The guys talked about the huge hills they had to climb to get back into housing.  We will have the next Teach In during the lunch hour and hopefully others will be able to attend. 

Brian Davis

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SocksPlus Update

R.A Washington, poet

There was a really nice fundraiser last week at 78th Street Studio a facility that I had no idea existed in Cleveland.  Spending most of my existence on the East Side, I cannot understand how I missed this place.  It is a giant warehouse full of artists from all different media.  It is definitely worth a walk through.  Thanks to RA Washington, Katie Daily, and Russell Vidrick for performing poetry at the #SocksPlus benefit last week.   I recorded Vidrick years ago when I did a poetry show on WRUW-FM 91.1 so it was nice to see him again. 

Community West Foundation also held a #SocksPlus campaign this weekend in the Gordon Square area.  We are nearing the end of the second round of boots and backpacks that we are distributing on the streets of Cleveland.  We are purchasing new items for the upcoming month. We are focusing on keeping people dry over the next few months.  We will have a backpack and boots but also rain ponchos, sleeping bags and tents available. We are still working on building relationships with people to get them inside.

Katie Daily, poet

We received a large number of hygiene items from Fairview Hospital this last week.  People have been dropping off socks at the Community West Foundation and sending it to both us from Amazon.com.  We received blankets from Pat Catans and some additional panels to be made into additional blankets.  People have dropped off comforters, and winter items.  We have delivered boxes of clothing to the Cosgrove Center for their weekly giveaways.  We have also involved a couple of additional partners to giveaway the items.  Last weekend, we had a family drop off backpacks full of small gifts and hygiene items for homeless people.   And we are still getting blankets for our blanket drive.  We gave a little over 100 blankets to 2100 Lakeside this week. 

One item that we have not gotten as many as we had hoped through our blanket drive is towels or wash cloths.  Many of the outreach workers have been calling asking for towels, but we really have not seen many donated this week.  We are still doing the blanket drive for another month. 

Brian Davis

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#SocksPlus Benefit for Winter/Spring Items

In the Detroit Shoreway neighborhood at the 78th St. Studio (north of Detroit Ave.) on March 20 the Community West Foundation has organized a poetry slam and photo display. This show will raise funds for the Socks Plus campaign.  We have distributed the first batch of backpacks with boots and socks and we are waiting for the second batch of boots (delayed two weeks).  We are putting in our order for another round of cold weather gear and clothing to keep people dry.  We were also able to keep 12 people safe over the last two weeks of the extreme cold by using some of these funds to put the hardest of our cases into rooming houses. 

Hope that you can attend this fundraiser to support the SocksPlus campaign. 

Brian Davis

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The Value of Outreach and Supportive Housing

The public is welcome to attend if you want to know how these programs work in the community.  We want to show politicians and other community leaders the value of both outreach and Permanent Supportive Housing.  You can see this beautiful new building on the West Side of Cleveland and how the homeless programs have transformed this neigbhorhood.  We ask that you RSVP by calling NEOCH at 432-0540. 

Mediation/Conflict Resolution Training

Here is a copy of the flyer that you can print out and distribute.

This is a partnership between the Cleveland Mediation Center and the Homeless Coalition to teach people how to de-escalate and work for compromises in a polarized society.  We hope to have volunteers and outreach workers attend to learn how to settle disputes on the streets.  We only have 25 slots available for this event, so you must RSVP your spot.  We need to thank the Community West Foundation for making this training available and free to members of the struggle to end homelessness in Cleveland.

Brian Davis

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Commercial for the SocksPlus Campaign in Cleveland

If you were watching the Walking Dead marathon this week, you saw the above commercial for the SockPlus campaign.  Thanks to the Community West Foundation for organizing this event.  The men and women started receiving the backpacks full of winter boots and other cold weather items.  NEOCH worked to find the best prices for these items (thanks Galco Army Store on East 71st near Harvard, Vanlly Shoes, and Velotta Uniform for all their help).  We are working on a system for assuring no duplication and the outreach workers are beginning to give all the items away. 

Brian Davis

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Distribution Started on Socks Plus

We have purchased the first back packs full of winter items for homeless people as part of the Socks Plus campaign.  Here is a picture of a group of guys who received a back pack from Denise this weekend.  They were very thankful for the backpack, the new boots in their size, and a pair of long underwear.  The backpacks had winter thermal socks and a light snack along with some handwarmers inside.  The backpacks are really nice durable military grade sturdy equipment and contain equally nice boots that should last throughout the winter.  We have to thank Galco Army Store off Harvard for all their help. 

There is an advertisement running on cable tv right now about the campaign and radio spots on three radio stations including "The Fish."  Here is a copy of the commercial on Youtube.  We will be able to give out these backpacks throughout the winter to guys who stay outside with the help of the Community West Foundation campaign.  We keep them safe while we work on building trust and eventually moving people back to housing.  Socks Plus is our first step to moving people back into a home.

Brian Davis

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Tyrone Talks About the Importance of Outreach

Tyrone is the first graduate of the Community West Foundation funded program to expand outreach locally.  Tyrone worked for NEOCH for four months learning how to be an effective outreach worker.  He learned all about the other programs in the community and tried to get to know the people on the streets.  We are so fortunate that we were able to get him a job at Care Alliance to do this work full time.  He is an amazing asset for the community.  He has a real passion for helping people outside, and is on the streets in the afternoon and evening. 

Brian Davis

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Socks Plus Campaign Begins at Stand Down

In 2014, staff from the Community West Foundation toured some of the encampments around Cleveland and sat down to talk to those who live outside.  Nearly every one they talked to said that they needed warm socks and boots.  The outreach workers also agree that boots and socks are in short supply for most of the year.  Health care clinics are regularly dealing with foot issues because of all the walking done by homeless people.  The Community West Foundation staff caucused and decided to focus some funding on what they are calling the "Socks Plus" campaign to raise support for socks and boots for homeless people who spend a great deal of time outdoors. 

NEOCH is gathering quality socks and boots along with other winter items to distribute to as many people as possible over the next few weeks.  Community West staff, Peter Schindler, attended the homeless Stand Down and then came to the Metanoia Project to see the first distribution of the Socks Plus campaign.  NEOCH outreach worker, Denise Toth, gave away thermal winter socks and thermal hoodies on Saturday evening to everyone at the Metanoia Project.  We are gathering backpacks now that the Stand Down is over to give out to homeless people who are reluctant to go to shelter.  These backpacks will be full of thermal tops, handwarmers, gloves, boots and the thermal socks.   We will continue the distribution through the spring and may add rain ponchos or other items to keep people dry. 

The Second District Police also gave away items this weekend that they collected including new underwear and new socks at Metanoia.  We want to keep people warm and dry this winter. We do not want to see people losing limbs or dying because of the cold in Cleveland.  Our primary goal while working with homeless people is to keep them safe.  The most dangerous time for hypothermia is the spring when it is hard to keep dry.  The lower temperatures and the rain is a killer for homeless people. Thanks to the Community West staff and all those who donate to the Socks Plus campaign. We will keep the community updated about the distribution of these critical items as part of the Socks Plus campaign.

Brian Davis

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